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The Rawlings’ Democracy: A Look at the Madness of Power

Posted by Business in Ghana on November 3, 2010

By Kofi Akosah-Sarpong

They are supposed to be from the same ruling National Democratic Congress (NDC) party but events wheeling within the party are diametrically different. At certain times, it is as if the NDC is in permanent chaos, caught in self-destruction, about to explode into pieces. It is as if the NDC has mutated into two opposition parties deadly contesting for power. Read the rest of this entry »

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Archbishop Palmer-Buckle’s “Funeral Oration”

Posted by Business in Ghana on October 24, 2010

By Kofi Akosah-Sarpong

The Ghanaian enlightenment campaign is evolving. Ghanaian elites, for some time asleep, are fast getting involved in the enlightenment movement from their diverse stations in life. As the movement gathers steam, backed by the Ghanaian mass media, one area of the Ghanaian traditional life that has come under the enlightenment flashlight is the implications of the dead and funeral on the living.

It is a tough area that borders on the complicated traditional cosmology. The attempts aren’t to tinker with traditional cosmology. It isn’t because it is a frightening area; it is because the aim of the enlightenment thinkers is to debunk the misinterpretation of traditional cosmology, especially in the southern parts of Ghana, where millions of dollars are profligately spent on the dead and funerals while majority languish in wrenching poverty and stuck in backward social infrastructure. Read the rest of this entry »

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Finally, Some Sense in National Planning

Posted by Business in Ghana on October 18, 2010

By Kofi Akosah-Sarpong

The proposition by the chair of Ghana’s National Development Planning Commission, P. V. Obeng, that stakeholders in the financial sector should factor in the informal, traditional sector not only go with the current enlightenment thinking but it also reveals the ongoing attempts by Ghanaian policy-makers to think hard from within their traditional values for progress.

The reason for such thinking today, as we build-up on various attempts in this regard some 50 years ago, is that the informal, traditional sector has for the past 50 years been neglected and not grounded in national policy planning. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tradition as solution to the excesses of modernity

Posted by Business in Ghana on October 17, 2010

By Kofi Akosah-Sarpong

One of the development issues expected of the modern Ghanaian/African state is how the state, as a rational entity, juggles openly Ghanaian/African traditional values with modern ones. The on-going African enlightenment movement argues for such, as a way of simultaneously refining the inhibitions within the Ghanaian/African culture and appropriating the enabling aspects for progress.

The traditional chief of Ghana’s Ajumako Solomon, Nana Kweku Dawson, indirectly said this when he advised that “the re-introduction of customs such as puberty rites” will “help check teenage pregnancy and the spread of HIV/AIDS.” It is rightly Ghanaian thinker George Ayittey’s “Africa solution to Africa problems.” Ayittey isn’t saying absolute African solution to absolute problems. There are flexibilities. Ayittey is saying pretty much of Africa’s problems could be solved with African values, especially in a highly globalized world where both the good and the bad values criss-cross borders at ease. Read the rest of this entry »

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Pondering Africans’ beginnings for advancement

Posted by Business in Ghana on October 17, 2010

By Kofi Akosah-Sarpong

The Accra Sports Stadium was re-named Ohene Djan Stadium by the former ruling National Patriotic Party (NPP) in 2004. Then the Ohene Djan Stadium was re-named again as Accra Sports Stadium by the Accra Metropolitan Assembly (AMA) September, 2010.

The first naming was innocently nationalistic, the second on purely ethnic feelings. This has set off an irate debate that had larger implications than AMA had thought of. This is expected, considering the manner African nation-states were created some 50 years ago. The controversy has also opened the debate about where the entire Ghanaian, and for that matter African, ethnic groups came from to their present abode. AMA’s argument has raised insightful public talks for Ghanaians and other Africans. Prof. Jacob Ade Ajayi, the eminent Nigerian historian and editor of General History of Africa (1989), who has done a lot work in this context, will be of help as a clarifier. Read the rest of this entry »

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