Business in Ghana

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Posts Tagged ‘Afari Gyan’

Before Election Results Are, Pink Sheets Is. Critical News, 16th June 2013

Posted by Business in Ghana on June 16, 2013

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

Citizen Vigilante had his day in court, Citizen Vigilante won his day in court.  Martin Amidu took his case against Waterville and Woyome and in no uncertain terms, the Supreme Court gave its ruling and clawed back $47million.  Even though they deferred to the lower courts to decide on Woyome, they fired a critical salvo against lawyers in the cases, Peasah Boadu for Waterville, Osafo Buabeng for Woyome, Tony Lithur for Austro Invest and maybe Ekow Awoonor who acted as sole mediator between parties with then AG Betty Mould Iddrissu.  They referred matters to the Legal Council and we expect some action.  I am thrilled that perhaps this is a signal to Ghanaians that our Supreme Court has found wings to cleanse the timidity stigma, asserting their self-ruling judgment in contrast to lugging government wishes.  Two things.  The Supreme Court restoring confidence in its independence and Martin persevering to the end and securing the verdict that all were skeptical the Supreme Court would scupper.  So after I heard this, I wondered if President Mahama talking to his NDC family, which is no big deal, could upset the Judges, making them think he was trying to influence their decision.  Might they rather tow a hard line, slighted by his presumptiveness and belittling their intelligence? Read the rest of this entry »

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Fire and Witchcraft Tactics For Over-Voters. Critical News, 9th June 2013

Posted by Business in Ghana on June 9, 2013

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

My reckless adventure into selling street side top-ups, taught me a valuable lesson this week.  I usually buy credit from Kojo Mbrah (his real name), been doing so for at least a year and we have become good buddies.  I get the occasional credit, same as I get from my newspaper boy Kwesi at the foothills of McCarthy Hill.  They are always surprised that sometimes their Obroni does not have five cedis to make the essential purchase.  Anyway, in a dare with Kojo I challenged that I could sell more credit with less effort than he does in a day.  He took me on, Tuesday morning and I parked opposite Abrantie Spot at La Paz and hit the streets with a stack of top up cards trusted to me by Mr. Mbrah.  I spent planning time and placed the cards in separate pockets to ease delivery, and with a list of all my stock, I trumped east side, close enough to the traffic lights as I see them do every time.  Fifteen minutes later I had sold two cedis and the race for the cars was hot, not counting the rising sun and no adjustable air conditioning.  I am pushing harder and harder, profiling my competitors and gauging their positioning strategy on the curbs.  In an hour, my sales tally was still two cedis.  Nobody is buying from me, customers are taken and loyalty to sellers is key.  I have become an enigma rather than a novelty item, which I was counting on.  My bet was I pay Kojo his fifteen cedis profit he makes in a day if I could not sell as many in half the time, and as I am running up and down the road breaking the law, a Trotro labeled “agoro anso a, egu”  (if a game does not prosper, it finishes) made it an easy choice, when it nearly mashed my toes.  I am standing on the curb, fishing invective from my decadent childhood, thinking, Kojo makes four hundred and fifty cedis in a good month.  I could earn that kind of money in a day if I lectured at Ashesi University or as an advisor to Government.  I pay Kojo his fifteen cedis and head for the cool comfort of the car.  This street hawking is tough, dangerous, illegal and perilous.  The barriers to entry are sealed with consumer loyalty and you don’t stand a chance as a new entrant.  They are a poverty cartel of friends, linked through a common survival purpose.  Don’t do as I did.  Life is very different at Informal sector level. Read the rest of this entry »

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Countdown To The Pink Sheet Count. Critical News, 1st June 2013

Posted by Business in Ghana on June 2, 2013

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

This is so frustrating and I wonder if I can ever get over it.  Institutions in Ghana commit to delivering solutions without a care to a promise.  We citizens are beholden to this unique group of handicapped managers who know they are incapable of delivering what they promise.  Deep down, we also know they are not capable, but we hang on to a string of hope that just mayhaps, some unknown phenomenon will enable ECG to meet a timetable for load shedding scheduled to end this week (my week ends on Saturday).  I am not as gullible, so I woke up at 4am Sunday, noted a few points pending a switch on, which went out at 6.30pm last night.  Since then, four flickers of light, thirty seconds each.  From experience we switch off all appliances soon as the lights go out, cheaper than buying a new fridge or deep freezer.  But should I have to live this way?  This is the twenty-first century for Christ sake and I am competing with other parties interested in supporting the same international clients I am courting.  The damage control I have to go through just to maintain the client does not leave any space to do the work itself.  I am constantly emotionally exhausted, clinically fatigued and mentally sapped at the end of every week.  My Sundays used to be leisurely, easy, calm and relaxing, looking forward to the occasional visitor dropping in unexpectedly and making life a worthwhile trip.  But this? This is just “knaff”, to borrow a very Cockney expression. Read the rest of this entry »

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Campaign 2008

Posted by Business in Ghana on June 9, 2008

NDC CAPTURES PRESIDENCY, NPP RETAINS PARLIAMENT
This will be the likely outcome of the 2008 General Elections in GHANA if it is free and fair according to my research. While many dread such an outcome. I am all for it. Why? Because I think that will be the best thing ever happened to our democracy. It will strengthen Parliament to play its critical role in Nation building. The current Parliament is too weak to play any effective role in national development. It has abandoned its role as a check on Executive power. It is not performing its role of being the controller of the purse rather it exist to just rubber stamp Executive acts without any critical examination and debate. It fails to check abuses, it does not invite Ministers to Parliament for hearings, and has no power to act when people like Wereko Brobbey treat the house with contempt. A parliament controlled by the opposition is our surest bet in reducing governmental corruption.       

My conviction of the outcome of the 2008 general elections is based on the fact that the advantage enjoyed by the NPP in the last presidential elections has been eroded by failure of government to honour its promises, rise in poverty, the energy crisis, armed robbers terrorising people, large army of unemployed youth who the NPP led government has failed to create jobs for.

Ben Ofosu -Appiah, Political Analyst

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