Business in Ghana

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Posts Tagged ‘CPP’

Timidity Is The New Revolution. Critical News, 11th May 2013

Posted by Business in Ghana on May 12, 2013

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

I posted a very historical “Lest We Forget” piece on my Blog this week, written by a very good friend Kwasi Gyan Appenteng.  Down memory lane to 1983, he strolls through time with palpitating nostalgia that hit hard and made me reminisce about times gone by, when revolution meant violence and student agitation shut down the University for two years.  When I first saw the email subject matter, I thought, great, Kwasi has not forgotten Kume Preko and the murder of Ahonga and Ahulu, when we marched against economic hardship and VAT on 11 May 1995, but alas his hike was different.  I found this recount of the crimes by ACDR’s (revolutionary guards as then called) a not-to-be-forgotten history of what happened that day.  It is a painful Marxist memory of Ghana, after the nebulous Nkrumaism, which masked cult worship as an Africanus paradigm but really meant constitutional dictatorship.

This publication from Modern Ghana.com is short enough to repeat verbatim and carries the key mixes then and today.

The article was headed

“KUME PREKO” On CNN, BBC” Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Critical Weekly News, Sydney Casely-Hayford | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Lest We Forget – 1983 – Thirty Years Ago

Posted by Business in Ghana on May 11, 2013

By Kwasi Gyan Appenteng

The year 1983 perhaps was the harshest year in Ghana’s modern history. In some countries there would be retrospectives, symposia and other kinds of public reflections on this most devastating year in our collective memory. When I say “collective”, I am referring to those who have not forgotten because they were there and those who have chosen not to forget because they remember. There cannot be many of the latter because general amnesia is another Ghanaian strategy for enduring the pain of the recent past, especially those for whom remembering the past is inconvenient.

The year 1983 did not start well. One of the harshest droughts was in progress. There had been little meaningful rain since 1981; that is it has either rained little or the rain had come at the wrong place and time. The drought could not have come at the worst possible moment. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Politics, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments »

Inhale, Hold it, Hold it ……… WOYOME! Critical News, 23rd December 2012

Posted by Business in Ghana on December 23, 2012

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

This past week Mr. J. K. Zormelo was moved to insult me for bringing up what I considered critical news for the week.  He posted a comment to my blog, labeled me a “bigot” and a “very bitter person”.  Read it here.  I was amused and provoked enough to reply his comment.  I hope I got it right, but sometimes writing a piece does not cover all the thoughts adequately and it can turn long-winded and tortuous, but I am impressed that he wrote and gave me an opportunity to explain a little more of my thoughts.  You are welcome Mr. Zormelo.

Next Sunday I will write the final Critical News for the year.  The NPP would have filed their case by then and we will have a lot to “talk” about.  Before then I am looking ahead and wondering.  What happens if the NPP presents a solid case and convinces the Supreme Court that it was a fraudulent election?  The judges have one of three actions to make.  Ask President Mahama to step down and out, direct for a re-vote, ask that President Mahama stay on as President and the EC must ensure that we have a clean and no-rigging protest in 2016. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Critical Weekly News, Sydney Casely-Hayford | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 7 Comments »

You Turn, Utong. Pees Chasing Cee. Critical News, 30th September 2012

Posted by Business in Ghana on September 30, 2012

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

I need more detail on the NPP’s financial solution to free SHS.  I want the scheme in place, I have 4 wards in various stages of school and I feel the pinch severely when term starts.  On average, it costs no less than ghc200 even if it is a Government assisted school.  Textbooks, exercise books, school uniforms, bags, shoes, transport fares, and it goes on.  The way I am looking at it, if I get to save that money with a free education policy, I get to have minimum disposal income of some ghc2,400 per year (200cedis x 4wards x thrice a year).  It works out more than that, but using this as a thought, can you imagine the lighter load parents will have?  That is why it is absolutely important that this can happen.  It matters not which party does it, I just would like to see it happen.  But the numbers are not yet clear to me and I have not heard a very well thought out financial plan from the CPP or NPP or PPP.  The NDC is not offering free SHS education on the grounds that it cannot be done for at least 20 years ala their education minister.  The idea is long overdue. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Critical Weekly News, Sydney Casely-Hayford | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Our Political Leaders Must Seek ‘Intellectual Wisdom’ from the Electorate

Posted by Business in Ghana on July 24, 2011

By Katakyie Kwame Opoku Agyemang, Hull. UK.

Since time immemorial, Ghanaians have been speaking with their chests out to portray to the whole world, especially their counterparts in the sub-region that they are indeed unique creatures. They base their pride on the rich human resource, abundant natural resources, cultural heritage, religious tolerance and even the democratic environment that they have nurtured. Before 1957, the country was called the Gold Coast (Land of Gold) in apparent reference to the abundance of gold deposits along her coast. Currently, Ghana ranks second to South Africa in gold production in Africa. Talk about politics and the proud Ghanaian will boast that Ghana was the first to win political independence in the sub-Saharan Africa. Read the rest of this entry »

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Pondering Africans’ beginnings for advancement

Posted by Business in Ghana on October 17, 2010

By Kofi Akosah-Sarpong

The Accra Sports Stadium was re-named Ohene Djan Stadium by the former ruling National Patriotic Party (NPP) in 2004. Then the Ohene Djan Stadium was re-named again as Accra Sports Stadium by the Accra Metropolitan Assembly (AMA) September, 2010.

The first naming was innocently nationalistic, the second on purely ethnic feelings. This has set off an irate debate that had larger implications than AMA had thought of. This is expected, considering the manner African nation-states were created some 50 years ago. The controversy has also opened the debate about where the entire Ghanaian, and for that matter African, ethnic groups came from to their present abode. AMA’s argument has raised insightful public talks for Ghanaians and other Africans. Prof. Jacob Ade Ajayi, the eminent Nigerian historian and editor of General History of Africa (1989), who has done a lot work in this context, will be of help as a clarifier. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Kofi Akosah Sarpong, Social Services | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »