Business in Ghana

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Posts Tagged ‘Duncan Williams’

We Got Our Prostitute Back. Critical News, 17th May 2015

Posted by Business in Ghana on May 21, 2015

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

Why would anyone call you a prostitute because you are fed up with a persistent never-going-away erratic power supply? So you are tired and fed up with living conditions in the country, you decide enough is enough and call for a demonstration with your followers and that makes you a prostitute?

An apology is not even acceptable in the wake of the after-thought.

Why would anyone call you a “cannibal” because you disagree with the way energy supply is handled? What goes through a mind when you conceive the idea that you can skin your mother alive and use her skin to drum your success to the world?

What kind of an insulting mind should one have before you say things like this? Those are the words of children playing in the yard and teasing each other to see who can come up with the most diabolical description of gruesome to shock and awe friends and end up laughing at each other, especially at the loser, who must now concede and turn away from the most glib-mouthed child on the playground.

When you hear the acting chief executive of the National Youth Authority say this and even believes he is so sharp-tongued that he posts it on his face book page, you have to wonder the kind of leader he is trying to be. But Halidu Haruna and Ras Mubarak said this, and later did a radio circuit giving apologies of sorts. Read the rest of this entry »

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An Ebola Prayer. Critical News, 19th October 2014

Posted by Business in Ghana on October 19, 2014

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

And true to prediction, the past week was crazier than the week before. Before we could even get to grips with all the unraveling from the Brazil 2014 Commission of enquiry, whether the players have revolted or just simply see no reason to break off their talented occupations to attend lame-duck sessions after the money has been divvied and chopped off their backs, the incompetent triple inventors of dumsor (VRA, GRIDCO and ECG) hit us with a new load shedding program. One day off, one day on.

The energy problems are far from over. We can’t privatise Akosombo, but we can do something about ECG and GRIDCO. Yet this Government continues to deliberate on what it knows is the best solution for solving the crisis.

Instead of focusing on the proper solutions, we hear preposterous ideas such as a solar farm to generate 2,000MW of energy, offshore energy barges made in Turkey and this last one the construction of a 1,000 MW sea wave power production project in Ada in the Greater Accra Region.

We are considering sea wave technology, said to have been produced in Sweden and for the first time such technology will be deployed in Ghana.

The Rance Tidal Power Station located in Brittany, France (where the technical partners for the Ghana project are from) is just 240 MW in capacity and it is the first in the world.

South Korea’s Sihwa Lake Tidal Power Station with an installed capacity of 254MW is currently the single biggest tidal energy installation in the world.

A professional friend in the sector wonders how and what special factors will give Ghana a 1,000 MW of tidal energy and thereby become a quadruple of the largest in the world. Read the rest of this entry »

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Preparing To Sue Satan. Critical News, 5th October 2014

Posted by Business in Ghana on October 5, 2014

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

Reading through all the unfolding events at the National Students Secretariat this week, I had an epiphany. Why don’t we sue Satan for all the woes we are going through in this country?

Coming so soon on the back of the CHRAJ Commissioner’s wanton throw away of Government funds, the Brazil matters in camera and public and the education in corruption coefficients by the Ghana Football Association boss, I am convinced we are in spiritual entanglements.

We have been systematically bound in various forms of high-end incantations spiraling us down a path of permanent impiety. And this is after all the tolerance for many religious causes we have followed to ground ourselves in self-righteousness.

To issue the summons on Satan, the biggest challenge we have of course, is his address. Where do we find him? There is a place called Hell in Texas, USA; our equivalent in Ghana is right here in Accra in the Korle Lagoon.

But we could have a solution because fellow panelist Yaw Oppong on Citifm’s The Big Issue has rightly informed me that we can serve notice on Satan and his numerous agents as accomplices (I am not the only crazy one on the panel). We only need a list of the agents.

So I am asking Arch Bishop Duncan Williams, Anita De Sosoo, Kwaku Bonsam and the many others who cast out demons and bind evil in the name of the Christ to please send me a list of all the potential Satan Agents they know. Provided the street naming and house numbering is complete we should be okay. Read the rest of this entry »

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A Palaver Of Unlike Minds. Critical News, 11th May 2014

Posted by Business in Ghana on May 11, 2014

Critical News, 11th May 2014

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

Oh, I struggled with this one.  I stumbled into mediation for a couple last week end.  As a rule I never get between couples, but this was very dear to my soul and I have their permission to use their story, definitely not their names.

Paapa and Akosua have been bickering on big, small issues for so long, three children all grown up and left home, they have a whole new set of problems.  Work, girlfriend, attention, fellowshipping etc..  Akosua is an avid Church goer, Paapa is still not convinced that all the solutions are with the Lord on high.  Money wahala too dey inside big time.

Left alone, no children to occupy them, PaaAkosua have resorted to fisticuffs, so bad, we were in the hospital removing stitches from her lower jaw.  A very repentant him was embarrassingly in the doorway, cowering from medical eyes, melding into the recesses of the curtains.

After we gingerly make it down the stairs and back home, I am confronted with a possible suit for assault and battery.  Akosua wants one back for this pain and suffering.  Looking at her face in the mirror, she turns to me and says “Sydney hwe me nim”. Read the rest of this entry »

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It Will Not Work Like This. Critical News, 8th February 2014

Posted by Business in Ghana on February 9, 2014

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

In secondary school, Accra Academy, 1966, one of our set books was King Solomon’s Mines, the narrative of Allan Quatermain, elephant hunter and explorer, and his adventures in the company of Danish man of action Sir Henry Curtis and Royal Navy officer Captain Good.

It made such an impression on all of us in the year group, we adopted names from the novel and assigned their characters to persons such as Scragga, the wicked bodyguard of King Twala.  Gagool, the witch doctor and chief advisor to Twala, was famous for being so ugly; and some persons found themselves on the wicked end of student humor throughout their five years.

But King Solomon’s Mines was significant for the use of “white mans” magic to mesmerise a more primitive community, displaying power and control over natural events, such as when a lunar eclipse conveniently presented itself to avert the sacrificial offering of the gorgeous Falouta.  Sir H. Rider Haggard’s novel was one of the best reads of our youth. Take a gander through the pages of King Solomon’s Mines from this link.

But what has been its significance in my life?  Acquiring knowledge to understand gullibility, ignorance and subservience by religion and poverty, why we hold on to mediocre existence in trepidation, scared of a return to a time when life was so bad, we gave up all and allowed Governments to take advantage of our docility.

I will borrow a quote sent by a friend because it is such a poignant phrase.  Winston Churchill. Read the rest of this entry »

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“I Command The Falling Cedi To Rise In Jesus’ Name” Is This A Bad Joke, Duncan-Williams?

Posted by Business in Ghana on February 2, 2014

Ben Ofosu-Appiah, Tokyo, JAPAN.

Only last week I wrote an article here on how we black folks sometimes allow our critical faculties, our ability to rationalize and think critically and have a pragmatic and scientific evaluation of facts and the evidence to be drown out by blind and unquestionable acceptance of things that defy reason and logic and are packaged and sold to us in the name of religion.

Everybody knows that the Ghana cedi has been in a free fall and the government has proven incapable so far in dealing with the situation. Investor confidence in the economy is low and business confidence in the country is reported to be at an all time low according to a recent report in the Daily Graphic.

The cedi has already depreciated by three per cent against the major international currencies this month. The US dollar, which sold at Ghc2.20 on the local foreign exchange market before Christmas last year, now sells at Ghc2.60. The British pound, which sold at Ghc3 now sells at Ghc4.20. The euro and CFA are also selling at Ghc3.50 and Ghc4.80 respectively. In 2013, the local currency suffered 17-per cent depreciation. The year-on-year depreciation shows a 21.96 per cent depreciation of the cedi against the dollar; 28.88 per cent against the pound sterling; 23.98 per cent against the euro and 25.54 per cent against the Swiss franc.

Read the rest of this entry »

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