Business in Ghana

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Posts Tagged ‘JDM’

Where The Better At? Critical News, 1st November 2015

Posted by Business in Ghana on November 1, 2015

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

And last week came and went oooo, and now we are in November with only one year left to the elections but more importantly, we have only 61 days to the end of “Dumsor”.

As promised to us in the State of the Nation address by His Eminent and Most Venerable Excellency President John Dramani Mahama, once Communications Minister of Ghana and former Member of Parliament for Bole Bamboi in the Northern Region which holds seventy-five constituencies and a population at last Census count in 2010 of 61,593 of who 56% are registered to vote.

His Most Uncreative and Emphatically Under-performing self-ariser to the throne of President trumpeted his voice and clearly told all of us he will “fix” it.

However, his accolades say he never gave a date. True, he didn’t. So he wants to take forever?

We have it on record that dumsor is over at the end of this year. We have sixty-one days left, today inclusive.

In paragraph 96 of the Mid-term review given by Seth Terkper, Chief Bishop of the Eminent Monarch of Ghana on 21st July 2015 he made all this very clear. The master plan for the Better Ghana had been considered and laid out for this sector. Read the rest of this entry »

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And Superman Left. Critical News, 25th October 2015

Posted by Business in Ghana on October 25, 2015

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

We have reached a tipping point on the voter’s register. The Let My Vote Count Alliance (LMVCA) have filed action against the police for the brutal beating and maiming of their marchers in a peaceful demonstration last month.

Not knowing what to do with the fall out from the march, the police had themselves initiated an accusation of unruly behaviour and deviation from the route as determined between them and the marchers.

The fact that the law is quite clear, in my opinion that you don’t need police permission in this country to go on a peaceful march, we will track this case and see how it rolls out. One thing the police should be clear about, this is not going to end with the LMVCA withdrawing their case. It will go to the wire, and of course with Justice Ajet Nasam on the road, there is enough hope that the system will hold its seams.

The honorable Justice has “escaped” from society for a few days, maybe months, we are yet to determine, but hopefully, others will now take their roles a lot more seriously and apply more diligence to the process of justice. I wish for the day when all the adjournments and delays will end and we will have faster justice.

I can’t believe we are still hearing the Abuga Pele and Assibit case after so many months and even as I was corrected by Fred Agbanyo on radio yesterday that Abuga has not been cleared in Chiana Paga to run for Parliament for the NDC, I take it with a pinch of salt, because I read it myself and it was very clear that a possible criminal had been selected to go to Parliament on behalf of the NDC party. Read the rest of this entry »

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The Rains Came Down, and. Critical News, 11th October 2015

Posted by Business in Ghana on October 11, 2015

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

This week, it rained. Two days of not what you would call relentless downpour, but it rained. I say for a country that is in the tropical zone, it was normal rain for two days.

But as if to test the drains and the waterways that E&P has fixed, and as if to give us a chance to expose more corruption, the rains came down and the floods went up; the rains came down and the floods went up, and the storm drains came tumbling down.

If you remember that well-aged nursery rhyme you can hum the words and understand how much these little childhood songs were meant to shape our world and remind us every time of the simple things we must do in life. A stitch in time saves nine? Rain rain go away? They are worded for a reason; reasons we have washed under waterways because we don’t see the wisdom in them any more.

Many advisory dance tunes, relevant in today’s Ghana, will be made political in a few months as we skate unwillingly to another euphoric December, when we should be lamenting our popularity contest through an electoral register with registrants from the ECOWAS fraternity.

Nkrumah Circle as usual, was flooded to the hilt together with all the flood prone areas, and this wasn’t a major storm. I was caught in it for an hour between The Times junction and Nkrumah circle. When I arrived at the small bridge over the Odaw River, it was rising and starting to rapid. Even as I longed for a dinghy to float to the confluence of the Korle Lagoon, the stench that told me “cholera” reined in my adventurism and stopped me numb in my car seat. Read the rest of this entry »

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Confused Numerology. Critical News, 26th July 2015

Posted by Business in Ghana on July 27, 2015

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

For those of us who chose to ignore Finance Minister Seth Terkper’s mid-term budget review, we probably missed a lot in the art of numerology. I am an accountant by profession. I am actually a fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants, UK, I have been that for quite some time. I don’t do any more auditing work, a little beef I have with looking at numbers after people have raided the bank accounts and diverted all the cash they can lay their hands on.

And especially in Ghana, a source of immense frustration for me and right-thinking Ghanaians.

But back to numerology. I couldn’t listen to the full delivery in Parliament, so I chose to read the script in detail after the fact. I have to say one thing about the Ministry of Finance, they release electronic versions of all the speeches and fiscal reports in a timely fashion, allowing us analysts to do some back checking and interpretation. Just wish that the numbers were true and fair.

I have spent quite some time with the Controller and Accountant General’s reporting and was on the verge of pointing out the inconsistencies in the numbers and monthly aggregations when the junior doctors blew the lid on the late salary payments going back eleven months.

How on earthly Ghana does anyone survive if they don’t get a paycheck for eleven months? And how in the name of Mahama does anybody find a place for their head on a pillow, knowing that a future leader and bread winner of a family is being discouraged from thinking that a good training as a doctor with its full prestige and as close to God as you can get as a human, is not a worthy profession at the end of the month.

I won’t let my daughter run around with a man who cannot put a cheque on the table at the end of a month? Who born dog, that I should rear a child and cultivate her only for a loser with no future prospects and who would make her pay the bills and look after his self-acquired existence through her effort. Read the rest of this entry »

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Vulture Chronicles. Critical News, 7th June 2015

Posted by Business in Ghana on June 8, 2015

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

We had a very bad accident. Over one hundred and fifty dead and still counting. So far the security agencies have not been able to give us a final count and the total cost of damage to families and businesses.

Needless deaths by any standard and unnecessary, since it was all government-made and could easily have been avoided if only we fulfilled promises we make on both the campaign platform and time in between.

My heart broke when I saw pictures of the dead and the damage to cars, property and surrounding areas in Circle and other places.

I rushed home after lunch that afternoon, the rain held us up in Kanda for a few hours and we took the next best lull in the outpour to set off home, not because we anticipated a flood, but simply commenting “it is really coming down, we must get home before the traffic gets out of hand”.

And on this note I have to say the Ghana Police MTTU division has kicked up a notch in their services. If we still had the kind of traffic control we were being served three years ago, most of us would be kicking six feet under.

And here is my first vulture proverb in this story. “Live with vultures, become a vulture; live with crows, become a crow”. Where does Ghana want to pitch its tent in the flight of civilization? Read the rest of this entry »

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Words With Matter. Critical News, 31st May 2015

Posted by Business in Ghana on May 31, 2015

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

I am watching the sketch artist on the sidewalk of Osu. There is a semi-circled crowd, every one of us caught in his gift as the creation comes to life with every stroke of his pencil. He is doing a simple drawing on two separate easels, side by side of each other.

He mimics every stroke on each one, equally dividing his attention to both of them so they all tow to life in tandem. His drawing is Oxford Street of Osu. The right easel is the right side of the road and on his left he captures that side, each easel showing the shops and fine detail the ordinary eye misses.

We glance up from the easel each time he makes a tiny revision and retains small detail; we with regular eyes murmuring how we missed the obvious.

But my attention is flitting from easel to the gorgeous damsel to my left, pretty beyond reality. Large eyes and luscious lips captured in an egg-shape face, which lights up each time she inhales in awe of the creationist, chatting animatedly to friends, used to her beauty, un-awed by this enchantment.

She herself is a fascinating statuette of proportions, a leg-length loose gown clutched in her left hand, failing to hide the figure beneath the dress. She is not immediately conscious of her allure, or maybe she is; every man in the half moon stealing glances even as they pretend to admire the creation unfolding before our eyes.

He is gifted by nature and she, our gift from nature; the two blending to demonstrate the wonder only a coincidence of nature can intermingle in a particular place such as we find ourselves. Read the rest of this entry »

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We Got Our Prostitute Back. Critical News, 17th May 2015

Posted by Business in Ghana on May 21, 2015

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

Why would anyone call you a prostitute because you are fed up with a persistent never-going-away erratic power supply? So you are tired and fed up with living conditions in the country, you decide enough is enough and call for a demonstration with your followers and that makes you a prostitute?

An apology is not even acceptable in the wake of the after-thought.

Why would anyone call you a “cannibal” because you disagree with the way energy supply is handled? What goes through a mind when you conceive the idea that you can skin your mother alive and use her skin to drum your success to the world?

What kind of an insulting mind should one have before you say things like this? Those are the words of children playing in the yard and teasing each other to see who can come up with the most diabolical description of gruesome to shock and awe friends and end up laughing at each other, especially at the loser, who must now concede and turn away from the most glib-mouthed child on the playground.

When you hear the acting chief executive of the National Youth Authority say this and even believes he is so sharp-tongued that he posts it on his face book page, you have to wonder the kind of leader he is trying to be. But Halidu Haruna and Ras Mubarak said this, and later did a radio circuit giving apologies of sorts. Read the rest of this entry »

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Smart Pioto. Critical News, 3rd May 2015

Posted by Business in Ghana on May 4, 2015

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

KKD, we all know him as KKD, his real name Kwesi Kyei Darkwa, has been around in the news for a long time, but recently as the man who had sex with a young nineteen-year old teenager in the bathroom of “hotel Kuffuor”.

The young lady yelled rape, pulled back and finally closed shop completely. The Attorney General and her team thought to make a scapegoat out of KKD, (#celebritieswithimpunity) but they did not succeed. The Lord was on KKD’s side. And this weekend, with Christian family and friends in tow, KKD is heading for church to thank his God for delivering him from the clutches of the evil Marietta Brew Oppong and human justice, to once again purify himself to be forgiven of all manner of adulterous behaviour, past and present and move forward, erected as new.

The Christian faith allows for that and once cleansed you can go forth and commit new sins to be forgiven in the future, before Armageddon.

Our society is just as forgiving, so the community faithful, who see no reason not to allow KKD back into the fold, overlooking the fact that he has breached certain sensibilities of human morality, fornicating in a place with a lady, younger than his own children, are happy to accept him as a new person, as since Jesus offered himself on the cross.

But that is not the point. He has shown remorse and offered penance to correct what he did wrong and our society does not lug punishment alongside for too long. Read the rest of this entry »

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In A Bad Mood-y. Critical News, 22nd March 2015

Posted by Business in Ghana on March 22, 2015

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

I was a reluctant walker up McCarthy Hill this morning. Very tired from a late night blitz, after one bottle of Guinness and some “rice and plasas”, I traipsed home to the now inevitable “dumsor” and lived with the gloom of a life I did not ask for but choose to be in.

Tired legs and an aging body, both conspirators in the endless dedication to keep me unhealthy, that I get sick so I might die young, but not till my work on this planet is completed and I move to Mars.

I have great hopes that Mars will be habitable by the time I am too old. It takes 150 days and 55,757,930km to reach, which means I am out even before I start the journey. I can only hope they find me a burial spot there, and since we Africans are not capable of creating an Awudome on that planet, I will have to contend with Arlington cemetery without US Citizenship.

So international rating agency Moody’s has been creating havoc for this government for quite some time. This past week, we have been downgraded from B2 to B3 and classified negative. To the non-financial person on the street, what this means is it will cost us more in interest rates and with tighter conditions if we attempt once again, which we are determined to do in May this year, to borrow another $1billion.

We have bonds falling due. The first is in October this year for $531million and the next two, in 2023 and 2024 for $1billion each. Finance Minister has put forward a refinancing plan to Parliament for approval and a cursory look at the document confirms much of what we say every time. Read the rest of this entry »

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Remembering Dictators. Critical News, 1st February 2015

Posted by Business in Ghana on February 1, 2015

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

My world futured back to the past on Legon campus over the weekend when I went to buy a book or two. My life, now consumed with large spats of power down-time, interspersed with benevolent electricity supply from VRA’s Kirk Koffie and his subordinates, I ventured to find Dr. Obed Asamoah’s book on the political history of Ghana (1950-2013), catch up on modern history and occupy my time when I cannot do any work because I am locked in a pretentious modern society, where I think I live in a civilized country but have no water and no control over noisy neighbors who fill my naturally ventilated open-window bedroom with smoke at five O’clock in the morning.

Legon bookshop killed my spirit. I swear I recognized some of the books from my days there in 1974. The layout has not changed, the categories of books are still the same and even the man who sits in the lifeguard chair, keeping an eye on potential student thieves was an aging version of the same one I knew then. He just has a glaucoma look in his eyes and if he can see anyone very well, I wonder if he can get off the high chair to arrest them.

I think the University dons must sit up. On a campus where there are many more banks per real estate kilometer than anywhere I know, you can’t even buy a book with a bankcard. Can’t even buy a CD-rom book, a tablet or even a book reader. Seems modernity overlooked them when it arrived because they had probably closed for the 2pm day on a Saturday.

I am so disappointed that our highest institution of learning just does not get it. Not even sure you can access a website of books in store. They still write prices of books in pencil and sign off. How do you still do this in a computerised world? And they had advertised they would be closed for stocktaking. In days when you stock take in real time. Bueei! Read the rest of this entry »

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