Business in Ghana

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Posts Tagged ‘Kutu Acheampong’

Outsourced Lying. Critical News, 29th March 2015

Posted by Business in Ghana on March 29, 2015

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

Thirty-seven years to the day Monday 30th, Ike Kutu Acheampong declared the results of his Union Government concept, which he claimed had been endorsed by the majority of Ghanaians in a general referendum, administered by then Electoral Commissioner Justice Abban, who “disappeared” for a few hours only to resurface amidst rumours he had abandoned his position.

In that giddy period, cowered Ghanaians hung on desperately for a few honest men, and in this instance, a political future hinged to the People’s Movement For Freedom and Justice, Dr. Bilson’s Third Force and the Front for Prevention of Dictatorship.

Justice Abban sought refuge with the Catholic and Methodist priests, Kojo Amissah, Hilary Senoo and Awotwe. Our democracy had been bullied into submission by the Military dictatorship of Kutu and but for the likes of the Association of Recognised Professional Bodies and some determined politicians, the nightmare of a misguided dictator, might have turned Ghana’s history a different direction.

Now we reflect on how excessive opportunity opened to another and even more vile dictator, whose self-fulfilling leadership left us with a looping history, shrouded truths in the cloaks of a revolution.

Kutu’s sole purpose was to win the Union Government idea, where no party will exist in Ghana, all politicking except his, would be banned and government would be in the hands of some so-called high council.

Well, it never happened because of a few stalwarts, but our world was taken over by the lies of Jerry Rawlings and his band of merry brigands, seeking revenge wherever. In the end they shot people without trial, abducted and murdered high court judges and “disappeared” many families with extra-judicial killings, paving the way for an annual ritual of meaningless rhetoric in an equally meaningless revolution. Read the rest of this entry »

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I 6th March Not. Critical News, 8th March 2015

Posted by Business in Ghana on March 10, 2015

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

The American is a freedom fighter, a go-getter and a person of courage. Brits are known for their stiff back and upper lip and are pursuers of right and justice. The Germans are hard workers and great engineers. Swiss are precision oriented and private. You can just as well describe Chinese and Japanese in their own way and skin.

And the Ghanaian?

I so struggled with a description for my Ghana-self and others who are Ghanaian just like me, but I was clearly looking in the wrong zongo.

The whole of my 6th March was captured behind a dvd player, watching a series of memorable movies, looking for the substance of the Ghanaian. I reviewed my connection with Gandhi, took a long walk to freedom with Mandela and fought a great battle with Chaka “Zulu” kaSenzangakhona. And in the process I missed the great march at Independence Square.

I have no movies of the great nation Ghana and how it came to be.

But I hear there were military people, police band and fire service, prisons service people, armored tanks and cars, a platoon of Special Forces and a buffoonery of masqueraders. The school children came, marched in the sun, no headscarves and headkerchiefs and fainted as they always do.

Then Prezdo stood on the back of the open-air car, saluted everybody and finally gave a rousing speech to urge the people on to the new level of “dumsor” and how to use it to counter religious conflict.

I was not there and you too were not there, so I am only recounting what I have been told and I am no wiser. Read the rest of this entry »

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Lest We Forget – 1983 – Thirty Years Ago

Posted by Business in Ghana on May 11, 2013

By Kwasi Gyan Appenteng

The year 1983 perhaps was the harshest year in Ghana’s modern history. In some countries there would be retrospectives, symposia and other kinds of public reflections on this most devastating year in our collective memory. When I say “collective”, I am referring to those who have not forgotten because they were there and those who have chosen not to forget because they remember. There cannot be many of the latter because general amnesia is another Ghanaian strategy for enduring the pain of the recent past, especially those for whom remembering the past is inconvenient.

The year 1983 did not start well. One of the harshest droughts was in progress. There had been little meaningful rain since 1981; that is it has either rained little or the rain had come at the wrong place and time. The drought could not have come at the worst possible moment. Read the rest of this entry »

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