Business in Ghana

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Posts Tagged ‘Millenium Compact II’

IMANI Alert: Government, Why Spend Millions on American Lobbyists?

Posted by Business in Ghana on August 17, 2014

The recent crisis of stranded Ghanaians in Libya has brought our country’s foreign policy into perspective.

In a routine monitoring of Ghana’s overseas diplomatic activities, IMANI picked up that the country has returned to the practice of engaging American lobby firms to represent its interests in the United States.

This was curious because the ruling party, when in Opposition, stridently criticised the practice, questioned the value, and lamented the amount of money spent on such exercises. They argued that the maintenance of a full diplomatic mission in the United States (in both New York and Washington DC, in fact) was sufficient to represent the full range of our interests in the United States, not least also because of the large diaspora of Ghanaian professionals, many of whom have deep connections across the political and economic landscape in that country.

Given that this matter of paid lobbyists has come up before one would have expected greater transparency on the part of the Administration in handling this matter. Yet, the Government did not so much as publish a single announcement. There was no international competitive bidding. Even if not by advertisement in the international press, a qualified bidding process could have been done by inviting several eligible lobby firms to submit expressions of interest. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Franklin Cudjoe, Politics | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

In an Economic Wilderness. Critical News, 10th August 2014

Posted by Business in Ghana on August 10, 2014

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

I finished form five at Accra Academy forty-three years ago. Forty-three years. We did the calculation this weekend when we came home to the Alma Mater on Saturday, boasting freely of stupid pranks, feeling comfortable with friends you forged early learning experiences, and listing colleagues now departed, fondly and regrettably.

We are old men now, sixty plus and balding, most of us in glasses, trying hard to get in and out of chairs without wincing, but determined to hold on to old drinking capacities and boasting empty Guinness and Club bottles, the whiskey bottle still a friend even with arthritic hands and extended belly guts.

We ate, laughed, let our hair down and yelled and sang profanities as if it was still yesterday and we had lofted ourselves into the school bus on the way to an inter-co competition, confident that Accra Aca would triumph again.

The old school changeth not; we saw and admired trees we had planted and nursed, punished to weed courtyards and football fields still in use and the grand entrance to the old school still welcoming as on the first day when you registered to spend the next five years with strangers who would become life-long bosom pals in the half decade.

There were enough of us to let the 2014-year group know that we are still a force and now an accolade and beacon for them to live to the expectations of a great school founded in 1931. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Critical Weekly News, Sydney Casely-Hayford | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »