Business in Ghana

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Posts Tagged ‘Nkrumah’

Timidity Is The New Revolution. Critical News, 11th May 2013

Posted by Business in Ghana on May 12, 2013

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

I posted a very historical “Lest We Forget” piece on my Blog this week, written by a very good friend Kwasi Gyan Appenteng.  Down memory lane to 1983, he strolls through time with palpitating nostalgia that hit hard and made me reminisce about times gone by, when revolution meant violence and student agitation shut down the University for two years.  When I first saw the email subject matter, I thought, great, Kwasi has not forgotten Kume Preko and the murder of Ahonga and Ahulu, when we marched against economic hardship and VAT on 11 May 1995, but alas his hike was different.  I found this recount of the crimes by ACDR’s (revolutionary guards as then called) a not-to-be-forgotten history of what happened that day.  It is a painful Marxist memory of Ghana, after the nebulous Nkrumaism, which masked cult worship as an Africanus paradigm but really meant constitutional dictatorship.

This publication from Modern Ghana.com is short enough to repeat verbatim and carries the key mixes then and today.

The article was headed

“KUME PREKO” On CNN, BBC” Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Critical Weekly News, Sydney Casely-Hayford | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Lest We Forget – 1983 – Thirty Years Ago

Posted by Business in Ghana on May 11, 2013

By Kwasi Gyan Appenteng

The year 1983 perhaps was the harshest year in Ghana’s modern history. In some countries there would be retrospectives, symposia and other kinds of public reflections on this most devastating year in our collective memory. When I say “collective”, I am referring to those who have not forgotten because they were there and those who have chosen not to forget because they remember. There cannot be many of the latter because general amnesia is another Ghanaian strategy for enduring the pain of the recent past, especially those for whom remembering the past is inconvenient.

The year 1983 did not start well. One of the harshest droughts was in progress. There had been little meaningful rain since 1981; that is it has either rained little or the rain had come at the wrong place and time. The drought could not have come at the worst possible moment. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Politics, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments »

Ghana @ 56; What Happened to the Promise and the Dream?

Posted by Business in Ghana on March 10, 2013

B.K. Obeng-Diawuoh, Bardstown, Kentucky USA

It is disheartening to note that Ghana, once the beacon of hope in Africa, a country so blessed with many natural resources cannot meet the most basic of its needs after more than half a century of political independence. Ghanaians today have no electricity and water. Over 40% of its citizens survive on less than a dollar a day, have no access to clean drinking water, uninterrupted electricity, basic health services, and formal education. What went wrong? Where did the promise and the dream go?

Yet any pragmatic discussion on the country’s economic situation degenerates into bickering partisanship, name calling, insults, heated tribalistic arguments that fail to identify the problems let alone address them. No wonder we are stagnating in our development efforts and even going backwards in some respects. I would like to draw readers attention to a very well written and well analysed article written by my dear friend B.K. Obeng- Diawuo, titled: Ghana: The Burden of Underdevelopment” Which you might not have read. So I am reproducing the original article here. Credit is due him. Please read on. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Ben Ofosu-Appiah, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Danquah On Nkrumah’s Propaganda Climb To Greatness

Posted by Business in Ghana on October 18, 2010

By Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko, www.danquahinstitute.org

In his maiden address to Parliament in January 2009, President JEA Mills, an avowed Nkrumaist, said, “We intend to honour Dr Kwamne Nkrumah’s memory with a national holiday to be known as Founder’s Day.”

Thus, September 21 is now one more of developing Ghana’s  numerous public holidays (17) to  force on the nation a break from our  usual ‘work and unhappiness’ routine.

Several articles were written and speeches made from the likes of political historian, Prof Mike Oquaye, a Danqua-Dombo-Busiast, and political scientist Dr Vladimer Antwi-Danso, an Nkrumaist, to the effect that “We cannot say that Nkrumah was the founder of the nation we call Ghana. Ghana does not have one founder.”

As our way of marking the day, the Danquah Institute has provided below an article wrote by Dr J B Danquah on October 2, 1961, where he traces Mr Nkrumah’s contribution to the independence struggle and the propaganda tactics he used to turn the ‘masses’ of Ghana against the other nationalist leaders. Please read below J B in his own words: Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Asare Gabby Otchere Darko, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Kwame Nkrumah: West Africa’s deluded Pan-Africanist

Posted by Business in Ghana on September 14, 2009

The behaviour must have been quite comical. An exiled former powerful president and hero of the African anti-colonial struggle cowering in his bedroom in fear, though nobody was really after him. Unbeknown to many, this was the other side of life Ghana’s founding father, Kwame Nkrumah, led in exile in Guinea-Conakry. This was despite holding the title of co-president bestowed upon him by his host, Ahmed Sekou Toure. In his home away from home, he spent most of his time hallucinating about his abduction and assassination by Western intelligence agents.

When his cook died in Conakry, he hoarded food in his bedroom fearing he would be poisoned. One of his waking nightmares was that someone was going through his mail.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , | 11 Comments »

Corruption and the fabric of our Existence

Posted by Business in Ghana on September 21, 2008

By Mike Mensah-Bonsu, former National Chairman of PNC and staunch Nkrumahist

I think we shall be doing our country a great disservice if we single out Mr. J.J. Rawlings as a ‘betrayer’ of his own rules.

Similarly, I do not agree with the imprisonment of Mr. Tsikata on the basis of corruption even though “there may be” clear proof of wrongful doing.

My comments are in no way intended to defend or attack these gentlemen in question. However, I firmly believe that vindication can never be the best form of justice and of resolving problems in our society, otherwise we may have to ‘get rid’ of many people – we have far too many corrupt men and women in Ghana – singling out “scape goats” is not the answer. The killing of the Honourable Judges, Afrifa, Kotoka, Achampong, Akuffo, Yaw Boakye, Felli, etc., etc., is still haunting the Nation – the result of vindication.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »