Business in Ghana

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Posts Tagged ‘Poverty’

The Battle Is Raging. Critical News, 17th April 2016

Posted by Business in Ghana on April 18, 2016

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

I am struggling with the inefficiency and rudeness in the public and private sectors. It is not that the service is poor, it is more that neither persons working for companies in the private sector nor the public sector care too much about you when they respond to questions over the phone. Warranted every once in a while you will get someone who thinks clearly and sensibly and is willing to bend over backwards to keep a customer satisfied.

I was at a very popular hotel over the weekend. Stressed out and very irritated by poor refereeing in the Leceister City v West Ham match, I settled into a quick meal to take off my accumulated stress. It took a while for the food to show up and I was pretty irritated and hungry by the time it hit my table.

My first forkful of chicken tasted off, slightly spoilt and I thought well what to do? Enough time spent waiting, I pushed all the pieces of chicken to one side and ate what I could of the rest of the meal. I am choosing to keep the name of the hotel out of it, it is somewhere I spend a bit of time and the end result was very good, when the chef came out and apologied and made amends with a complimentary bowl of fruit. Read the rest of this entry »

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Botha in a Vakpo. Critical News, 21st June 2015

Posted by Business in Ghana on June 21, 2015

Sydney Casely-Hayford, sydney@bizghana.com

My week was bedeviled with thoughts of my black existence. A resurrected quote from an old foe when I was seriously militant and so angry at Apartheid as a remedy to the black malaise in the world, came flying back at me with a chat message on social media.

All through the week, I ranted and raved at something that PW Botha said to his cabinet abut 27 years ago. I took it to heart and shared thoughts with my fellow OccupyGhana members, thinking it would sooth my anger, but I carried it with me all through a trip to the Volta Region.

It was only when we went through Vakpo that I found the answer to my ague.

So let me share what Botha said and you might just appreciate my angst.

We are not obliged even the least to try to prove to anybody and to the blacks
that we are superior people. We have demonstrated that to the blacks in 1001 ways. The Republic of South Africa that we know of today has not been created by wishful thinking. We have created it at the expenses of 
intelligence, sweat and blood……We do not pretend like other whites that we like the blacks.

The fact that blacks look like human beings and act like human beings do not necessarily make them sensible human beings. Hedgehogs are not porcupines and lizards are not crocodiles because they look alike. If God wanted us to be equal to the blacks, he would have created us all of a uniform colour and intellect.

But he created us differently; Whites, Blacks, Yellow, Rulers and the ruled. Intellectually, we are superior to the Blacks;
that has been proven beyond any reasonable doubt over the years. I believe that the
Afrikaner is an honest, God fearing person, who has demonstrated practically the right way of being. By now every one of us has seen it practically that the Blacks cannot rule themselves.

Give them guns and they will kill each other. They are good in nothing else but making noise, dancing, marrying many wives and indulging in sex. Let us all accept that the Blackman is a symbol of poverty, mental inferiority, laziness and emotional incompetence. Isn’t it plausible therefore that the Whiteman is created to rule the Blackman……And here is a creature (Blackman) that lacks foresight….. The average Black does not plan his life beyond a year”.

So tell me, despite the insult, has the black man been able to prove this man wrong after 27yrs? Read the rest of this entry »

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In An Unequal World, We Need Inclusive Growth

Posted by Business in Ghana on April 22, 2014

By Jim Yong Kim

For a very long time, the rich have known to some extent how the poor around the world live. What_s new in today’s world is that the best-kept secret from the poor, namely, how the rich live, is now out. Through  the village television, the Internet and hand-held instruments, which a rapidly increasing number of the poor possess, life-styles of the rich and the middle class are transmitted in full color to their homes every day.

Last year, when I traveled with President Evo Morales to a Bolivian village 14,000 feet above sea level, villagers snapped pictures on their smart phones of our arrival. In Uttar Pradesh, the state in India with the highest number of poor people, I found Indians watching Korean soap operas on their smart phones.

We live in an unequal world. But while the rich world may be blind to the suffering of the poor, the poor throughout the world are very much aware of how the rich live. And they have shown they are willing to take action.

Inequalities hurt everyone. Women_s low economic participation creates income losses of 27 percent in the Middle East and North Africa. Inclusive growth, in contrast, builds a stronger, more robust social contract between people and their government _ and builds stronger economies. If we raised women’s employment to the levels of men, for instance, average income would rise by 19 percent in South Asia and 14 percent in Latin America. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Financial Services, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

How Africa Can Transform Land Tenure, Revolutionize Agriculture, and End Poverty

Posted by Business in Ghana on July 22, 2013

WASHINGTON, DC, July 22, 2013 Sub-Saharan Africa is home to nearly half of the worlds usable, uncultivated land but so far the continent has not been able to develop these unused tracts, estimated at more than 202 million hectares, to dramatically reduce poverty and boost growth, jobs, and shared prosperity.

According to a new World Bank report, Securing Africas Land for Shared Prosperity, released today, African countries and their communities could effectively end land grabs, grow significantly more food across the region, and transform their development prospects if they can modernize the complex governance procedures that govern land ownership and management over the next decade. Africa has the highest poverty rate in the world with 47.5 percent of the population living below US $1.25 a day.

Despite abundant land and mineral wealth, Africa remains poor, says Makhtar Diop, World Bank Vice President for Africa. Improving land governance is vital for achieving rapid economic growth and translating it into significantly less poverty and more opportunity for Africans, including women who make up 70 percent of Africas farmers yet are locked out of land ownership due to customary laws. The status quo is unacceptable and must change so that all Africans can benefit from their land. Read the rest of this entry »

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Ghana @ 56; What Happened to the Promise and the Dream?

Posted by Business in Ghana on March 10, 2013

B.K. Obeng-Diawuoh, Bardstown, Kentucky USA

It is disheartening to note that Ghana, once the beacon of hope in Africa, a country so blessed with many natural resources cannot meet the most basic of its needs after more than half a century of political independence. Ghanaians today have no electricity and water. Over 40% of its citizens survive on less than a dollar a day, have no access to clean drinking water, uninterrupted electricity, basic health services, and formal education. What went wrong? Where did the promise and the dream go?

Yet any pragmatic discussion on the country’s economic situation degenerates into bickering partisanship, name calling, insults, heated tribalistic arguments that fail to identify the problems let alone address them. No wonder we are stagnating in our development efforts and even going backwards in some respects. I would like to draw readers attention to a very well written and well analysed article written by my dear friend B.K. Obeng- Diawuo, titled: Ghana: The Burden of Underdevelopment” Which you might not have read. So I am reproducing the original article here. Credit is due him. Please read on. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Ben Ofosu-Appiah, Politics | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

WHERE IS OUR $14 BILLION, MR. PRESIDENT?

Posted by Business in Ghana on December 4, 2012

By Eric K. Edusei, USA

The NDC Administration has mismanaged this economy and will eventually paralyze it beyond repair if conscious people do not ensure a regime change, by voting them out of office. This Administration has recklessly contracted loans over US$14 billion for purposes that cannot be justified by any stretch of imagination when cost to value is factored in. Have Ghanaians so soon become economic entities without a dream that we should succumb so easily to gifts instead of questioning our leaders about their qualities, vision and capabilities, before relinquishing our sovereignty to them? Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Politics, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

UNESCO report calls for quality education and equal access to technical training

Posted by Business in Ghana on November 12, 2012

ACCRA, 12 November 2012The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation, UNESCO, says the millennium pledge made by international leaders that all children would have a primary education by 2015 is going to be missed by a large margin. This is as a result of lack of funds and a general lack of interest in education.

These findings are contained in the 2012 Education for All (EFA) UNESCO Global Monitoring Report (GMR), an annual publication that measures progress towards EFA goals.

The Report reveals that in Ghana, quality primary education and availability of entrepreneur skills are fundamental to achieving the goal of putting education to work, and Ghana, like many countries, need to plan for skills development and make it accessible to most disadvantaged people. Devising means of linking the curriculum to local realities and including extracurricular practical exercises in the learning environment is vital to improving critical thinking and building a good understanding of the potential that the communities where pupils live in can offer says Mr. Dos Santos, Acting Director, UNESCO Cluster office in Accra. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Education, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , | 2 Comments »

Ghanaian Political Elites Have No Sympathy For The Poor

Posted by Business in Ghana on November 10, 2012

Ben Ofosu Appiah, Tokyo, Japan

There was a justifiably public outcry against the over 150% increase in salaries for the Executive, Legislative and the Judicial branches of government as published in the Ghanaian media. Coincidentally, just at the same time this outrageous salaries increase were announced, there was report in the news (which was later denied) that employees of Ghana Education Service have had their salaries cut. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Ben Ofosu-Appiah, Politics | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Despite Global Slowdown, African Economies Growing Strongly

Posted by Business in Ghana on October 4, 2012

World Bank Urges Countries to Spend Their New Oil, Gas, and Mineral Wealth Wisely 

 WASHINGTON, October 4, 2012  Sub-Saharan Africa is expected to grow at 4.8 percent in 2012, broadly unchanged from the 4.9 percent growth rate in 2011 and largely on track despite setbacks in the global economy, according to the World Banks new Africas Pulse, a twice-yearly analysis of the issues shaping Africas economic prospects.

Excluding South Africa, the continents largest economy, growth in Sub-Saharan Africa is forecast to rise to 6 percent. African exports rebounded notably in the first quarter of 2012, growing at an annualized pace of 32 percent, up from the -11 percent pace recorded in the last quarter of 2011. Read the rest of this entry »

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Jobs are a cornerstone of development, says World Development Report 2013

Posted by Business in Ghana on October 2, 2012

Washington, October 1, 2012 — In developing countries, jobs are a cornerstone of development, with a pay off far beyond income alone. They are critical for reducing poverty, making cities work, and providing youth with alternatives to violence, says a new World Bank report.

The World Development Report 2013: Jobs stresses the role of strong private sector led growth in creating jobs and outlines how jobs that do the most for development can spur a virtuous cycle.The report finds that poverty falls as people work their way out of hardship and as jobs empower women to invest more in their children. Efficiency increases as workers get better at what they do, as more productive jobs appear, and as less productive ones disappear. Societies flourish as jobs foster diversity and provide alternatives to conflict. Read the rest of this entry »

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